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DNC Hacker Guccifer 2.0 Leaks Show Alcohol Lobby Pushed Against Cannabis

The cryptic hacker Guccifer 2.0 continues to pour forth a diverse stream of ever evolving democratic party leaks. After revealing the party’s favoring of Hillary Clinton, emails now disclose messages from the alcohol lobby. Give you one guess what about–opposition to cannabis reform.

Mary Jane’s medical and recreational success in Colorado has opened up the airwaves to all sorts of debate. Even those pushing to peel the plant’s schedule 1 status away were curious if it could integrate into society. Driving laws came into immediate question, and how to detect and handle stoned drivers.

Hacker Guccifer 2.0’s New Leaks Reveal An Anti-Sanders DNC, And More

Hacktivist Guccifer 2.0 strikes again, sending a steaming hot cache of DNC documents to WikiLeaks. While some documents indicate internal skepticism of the Iran agreements, others are more jarring. Leaks outline how DNC officials literally conspired against Senator Bernie Sanders’ run for president. These new leaks offer a panoramic view of the party’s augmentation of Clinton’s campaign, while exploiting the weakness of others.

At least some of the material to pertaining to the Iran agreements were sent to The Hill. The deal was mentioned in notes sent between DNC political consultancy partners discussing tactics. Certain politicians were described as “wobbly democrats” who wanted to “scratch this thing.” Other notes on immigration called the current congress “the most anti-immigration” by far.

Local And Federal Police Visit Activist Homes Asking Questions Ahead Of Ohio RNC

Isn’t it wonderful when police knock on your door asking what your activism plans for the Republican National Convention are? That’s exactly what’s happening in Cleveland, where officers are going door-to-door probing activists and organizers. Such revelations beg questions on the use of police for surveillance of legal political activities especially in 2016’s election.

With Cleveland Ohio expecting an estimated 50,000 visitors for the Republican National Convention (RNC), preparations surely are needed. Many community organizers, however, shuttered after sleeping bags and soapboxes were banned at 2016’s RNC. Interestingly, Intercept reports, officials didn’t ban firearms, despite a recent attempt on Donald Trump’s life. Trump rallies, in particular, are known for their volatile nature, and acts of exclusion and violence are regular. RNC’s bans don’t account for these elements of the convention’s population.

Clinton Email Hack Show’s Campaign Monitored Unfriendly Or Critical Journalists

Hackers who allegedly infiltrated the DNC’s servers continue to raise the bar for info-jacking, and leaking. They’ve now moved to discredit repeated Clinton campaign denials that they too were had. A steaming hot cache of campaign documents, leaked to outlets, unveil the organization’s disturbing surveillance of journalists. The near Orwellian findings add to Clinton’s pattern of subversion and control of press and information freedom.

These most recent leaks were sent to the Smoking Gun, an outlet specializing in document acquisition. According to Smoking Gun, infiltrators targeted the email’s of staffers working in communications, campaign finance, and policy advisement.

Hacker “Guccifer 2.0” Complicates The Offical Narrative Of The DNC Hack

Hillary Clinton

Recently, hackers breached the Democratic National Committee’s (DNC) servers, making off with political opposition files. Although initial reports outed a collective of Russian hackers, a lone infiltrator now claims full responsibility. What the files reveal, as well as the drama surrounding their identities, offers an unusual view of modern digital espionage.

It began with the infiltration of the DNC’s servers by adept virtual spies, and the confidential files they downloaded. Hackers, noticed a month ago, first accessed DNC data for over a year. Their breach of communications was described as “unimpeded” by New York Times, requiring outside intervention. Cyber-security firm CrowdStrike, founded in 2011, was then recruited to expel and identify the hackers.

Spec Ops Forces Photographed In Syria Ordered To Remove Kurdish Patches

Towards the end of last month, photo’s surfaced paraded as the first to show US special forces inside Syria. Shot by an unidentified photographer, the images bore evidence of a war far more complicated than most may anticipate. While many outlets regurgitated the photo release, others echoed one apparent consequence of their disclosure.

All this reputedly comes out the village of Fatisah, just a few miles from Islamic State-held Raqqa. Sources report Kurdish militia groups have used Fatisah to stage a push on the militant capital. The fighters aren’t alone, however, as several American special forces operatives were reputedly photographed amidst the fight.

What We Learned From Wauwatosa PD’s Previously Unreleased Annual Reports

From 2004-2011, the Wauwatosa Police Department released yearly annual reports on its activities. The protocol wasn’t unusual, police normally provide some form of publicly available documentation. Of course, they don’t outline everything there is to know about a department, they’re simply transparent overviews.

In 2012, unlike other departments, Wauwatosa’s data never arrived to the city’s page. Around that time, the department cited challenges associated with a new report redaction policy it was forced to adopt. The policy, referenced in several Wauwatosa Now pieces, was enacted after a supreme court ruling on privacy rights.

A year later, Wauwatosa PD Captain Tim Sharpee said WPD was unable to do the redactions electronically. “So a clerk has to print out that report (and) redact all that information”, he said, alluding to the department’s lack of resources. In 2013, 10-13% of a department sworn for 94 officers left within a four month period. For a time, WPD claimed it lacked the manpower to process reports with the tedious methods available to them. It was assumed, but not entirely verified, that the annual’s were discontinued due to the same phenomenon that affected more regular reports.