Tag: new cold war

Does Russia Pose a Threat to the US?

(SCF) – Because it’s not in Russia’s best interests to do so, the Kremlin hasn’t sought an unnecessary confrontation with the West. The suggestion that some Russians live in a Cold War era mindset easily applies to the US military industrial…

The facts you need about the ‘New Cold War’

It’s time to separate some fact and fiction. The current show playing out center-stage in the global political theater is, of course, the “new Cold War”. None of the developments are spectacular. None are truly pressing. The “new Cold War” isn’t even that new. The first articles filled under “new cold war” on The Fifth Column date to over a year and a half ago. There’s nothing emergent about the current situation. It’s the natural progression of events.

Most of what is flowing through the news cycles right now, is nothing short of propaganda. TFC is taking this opportunity to provide some context behind some of the situations and dispel some of the blatant propaganda.

NATO’s Reluctant Two-Percenters

According to the 2014 US-NATO declaration of confrontation with Russia, all member countries are supposed to commit 2 percent of their GDP to military expenditure. But as with most NATO plans and endeavours, this one has failed to meet expectations.

Following dissolution of the Warsaw Pact in 1991 there ceased to be any reason for existence of the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation. The Pact had been formed in 1955 in response to inclusion of a rearmed West Germany in the US-NATO military alliance whose main objective was to: «settle any international dispute in which they may be involved by peaceful means… and to refrain in their international relations from the threat or use of force in any manner inconsistent with the purposes of the United Nations».

All disputes between the US-European alliance and the Soviet Union had indeed been settled by peaceful means. There had been a diplomatically-facilitated, non-violent end to the Cold War, and 1992 was the ideal time for NATO members to begin to withdraw their offensively-tasked troops, missiles and aircraft from the hundreds of bases surrounding the borders of the former Soviet Union. Politically, socially, militarily – and especially economically – the disbandment of NATO made sense. It was a clumsy grouping that, for all the propaganda, was almost entirely dependent on the US for offensive capability.