Tag: law enforcement

The God Line: Science, Psychedelics, And The Realms In Between

Interest in medicinal use for psychedelics is exponentiating within the confines of American consciousness. Perhaps successes in medical cannabis aided the humble psychedelics to transcend cultural stigma, but that’s less important.

What’s important is compounds like LSD and psilocybin have qualities besides medical benefits. Namely, the psychedelic experience: a journey through the self, outer world and, some report, those beyond. Psychedelic research oftentimes introduces scientists to a “god-line” separating simple medical curiosity, and “the other”. How is western– particularly American–science to navigate the god-line? Is our culture prepared for the consequences of crossing it?

Using public data to improve policing in Uganda

The Uganda Police Force has been continuously ranked as one of the most corrupt institutions in Uganda, and was identified as the most corrupt East African Region institution in the Transparency International East Africa Bribery Index. To its credit, it does have a promising legal framework, including a national information access law and law mandating discipline for police misconduct. The work now is to make those legal requirements work for the people of Uganda.

The people of Uganda deserve law enforcement agencies that are accountable and transparent. With the opportunities created by the 2006 Access to Information Act it’s possible for them to move forward by providing useful public information. There are some signs that the police are trying to make progress, principally with their publication of information about the public’s complaints. While this is a good first step, it’s insufficient. The quality and timeliness of this data must improve. In addition, police must work more effectively with the media to ensure that their information is getting out to a public which is unlikely to be able to find their information online.

Seattle Proposes Supervised, Arrest Exempt ‘Safe Spaces’ For Heroin Addicts To Use

In 2014, a Pew Research Center study revealed something perhaps viewed as impossible 10 years ago. Two-thirds of Americans felt that people shouldn’t be prosecuted for possession of heroin and cocaine. That trend has only spread, with even some police departments proposing radical new drug reforms. Seattle just raised the bar, however, and proposes safe spaces for addicts to use, and even get help.

City officials across the country are finding “radical” ideas like safe spaces more mainstream. Simply put, the body count of America’s opioid epidemic is ungodly staggering. In Gloucester, Massachusetts for example, police experimented with not sending addicts to jail. Instead, addicts are offered option to seek rehabilitation through it’s Angel Program.

DNC Hacker Guccifer 2.0 Leaks Show Alcohol Lobby Pushed Against Cannabis

The cryptic hacker Guccifer 2.0 continues to pour forth a diverse stream of ever evolving democratic party leaks. After revealing the party’s favoring of Hillary Clinton, emails now disclose messages from the alcohol lobby. Give you one guess what about–opposition to cannabis reform.

Mary Jane’s medical and recreational success in Colorado has opened up the airwaves to all sorts of debate. Even those pushing to peel the plant’s schedule 1 status away were curious if it could integrate into society. Driving laws came into immediate question, and how to detect and handle stoned drivers.

FBI Issues Gag-Order To Agents Following Clinton Email Decision

The FBI’s decision to not indict Hillary Clinton has been largely overshadowed by ongoing police killings and reputed retaliation. If it were getting appropriate media attention, then perhaps more of us would’ve heard of an unusual feature of the Clinton case. FBI investigators were ordered to sign irregular non-disclosure agreements forcing them into silence, unless called to testify. The latter, of course, isn’t happening, much to public and FBI suspicion alike.

Anonymous FBI officials who commented on the agreements felt they resulted from an “inside deal.” “This is very, very unusual”, said one unnamed official, claiming to never have signed or distributed one before. Some even felt the so-called “deal” may have had something to do with Loretta Lynch’s controversial meeting with Bill Clinton. No, this isn’t the talk of conspiracy theorists. According to Free Thought Project, a massive delay in a batch of Clinton emails came just days following the meeting. The specific form agents signed, New York Post reports, is dubbed a “Case Briefing Acknowledgement”.

Local And Federal Police Visit Activist Homes Asking Questions Ahead Of Ohio RNC

Isn’t it wonderful when police knock on your door asking what your activism plans for the Republican National Convention are? That’s exactly what’s happening in Cleveland, where officers are going door-to-door probing activists and organizers. Such revelations beg questions on the use of police for surveillance of legal political activities especially in 2016’s election.

With Cleveland Ohio expecting an estimated 50,000 visitors for the Republican National Convention (RNC), preparations surely are needed. Many community organizers, however, shuttered after sleeping bags and soapboxes were banned at 2016’s RNC. Interestingly, Intercept reports, officials didn’t ban firearms, despite a recent attempt on Donald Trump’s life. Trump rallies, in particular, are known for their volatile nature, and acts of exclusion and violence are regular. RNC’s bans don’t account for these elements of the convention’s population.