Tag: japan

On the Japan-China “Rail Wars”

There were several important outcomes of the previous three-day visit made by India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi to Japan (from November 10 to November 12, 2016), but it is the Cooperation Agreement on the development of high-speed railway transport that attracts particular attention.

It, alongside other facts that have emerged over the past few years, has led to Bloomberg publishing a thesis by American Orientalist Jeffrey Kingston on the expansion of the “rail wars” between Japan and China, which is taking on an almost global nature. This time it has manifested itself in the territory of India. The participants of the so-called “war” are resorting to methods that include both political influence on the leadership of the country that announces a tender for the construction of transport infrastructure, as well as the financial and technology attractiveness of the proposed projects.

China and Japan, the two global leaders in the construction of high-speed railways, have used these tools in full in the course of the first such tender announced by Indonesia last summer. A year ago, we briefly described the dramatic development of the Japan-China struggle to win the order to develop and implement the construction project of the 140-km long Jakarta-Bandung high-speed railway on the island of Java worth more than 5 billion dollars. The government of Indonesia found itself in a situation that can only be described as “dramatic” as it had to choose the winner out of the two leading Asian powers.

JAPANESE TROOPS EXPECT TO FIGHT OVERSEAS FOR FIRST TIME SINCE WWII

Japanese Defense Forces landed in South Sudan on Monday in an effort to aid UN peacekeepers and ultimately protect developing infrastructure in a country devastated by civil war. The 350 troops will replace a previous contingent of Japanese troops which did not have the constitutional authority to engage in combat.

Prior to 2015, the anti-war Japanese constitution did not allow for troops to engage in fighting overseas. But last year, lawmakers expanded the constitution to allow for some combat fighting overseas in certain situations. The troops deployed to South Sudan aren’t allowed to use force against an opposing army per se, but rather to protect civilians, UN members, and of course themselves. They will also be guarding UN bases which are reportedly frequent targets for attacks.