Tag: impunity

Femicide in Mexico and Guatemala

http://www.flickr.com/photos/66944824@N05/6347258362/sizes/l/ https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=26143911

Feminists in Mexico and Guatemala working on femicide also use the concept of ‘feminicide’ to draw attention to state complicity in the killings of women.

The word ‘feminicide’ was popularised over twenty years ago to denounce the killing of women due to their gender. The crime is called ‘feminicide’ (‘feminicidio’) in Mexico and ‘femicide’ (‘femicidio’) in Guatemala. Although there have been some attempts to differentiate the two concepts, both terms emerge as a form of resistance: to assert that women’s lives matter, and such crimes should not go unpunished. Impunity contributes to the normalisation of the feminicide machine. This ‘machine’ is supported by gender inequality as the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights have suggested.

Mass rapes to mass protests: violence against women in 2016

Impunity for violence against women remains a massive problem. Donald Trump hasn’t helped.

From historic convictions to impunity for gang rapes, 2016 has been a year of highs and lows when it comes to efforts to stem violence against women.

The annual 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence (November 25-December 10) are a time to take stock of progress and failings in combatting this pervasive human rights abuse.

In March, the International Criminal Court (ICC) reached its first conviction for sexual violence. It found a former Democratic Republic of Congo vice president, Jean-Pierre Bemba, guilty of rape, murder, and pillage in neighbouring Central African Republic. Bemba was found guilty under the concept of “command responsibility,” in which civilian and military superiors can be held criminally liable for crimes committed by troops under their control.

Four Police Officers Charged With Triple-Murder in Kenya

Yesterday, in a packed Nairobi court room, I watched Kenyan prosecutors charge four police officers with murder for the deaths of lawyer Willie Kimani, his client Josephat Mwenda, and their taxi driver Joseph Muiruri. The police officers pleaded not guilty.

This widely-reported case is more than a murder trial; it is a signature moment for all concerned with police abuse and impunity. Yesterday, it was encouraging to see some progress in the investigation and judicial process.