Tag: foreign policy

The Refugee and Friend Who Opened My Eyes About El Salvador’s Civil War

Lacking the innocence and serenity most kids his age had an abundance of, Osmaro Aviles lived in constant fear and anxiety. The peaceful sky I slept under every night didn’t exist in his world. Helicopters replaced the stars and machine gun fire drowned out the sounds of nature. While I played with rocks I discovered as I walked peacefully around my neighborhood, Ozzy walked to a brick house riddled with bullet holes, and without a roof, to play around with shotgun shells left on the ground surrounding the home, on the rare occasion he was granted freedom to go outside.

When you are raised in the western world and have a normal life free of debilitating trauma like I did, you expect everyone else lives in the exact same world. The world is your oyster; it’s peaceful,fun, and full of wonder. Little did I know a kid my same age lived in a world full of turmoil, violence and secrecy, that robbed children of the very things many of us still take for granted.

Are U.S.-Saudi Relations Finally Souring?

Pressure from human rights organizations like Oxfam to victims of the 9/11 attacks are helping erode the bond between these old political allies, but the results of this election season could squander our chance at change.

Congress recently passed the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act (JASTA) allowing families of victims of the September 11, 2001 attacks to sue other governments, including Saudi Arabia, for possible damages.

Despite threats by the Saudi government to sell billions of dollars’ worth of their assets and reexamine the bilateral relationship with the U.S., Congress snubbed the monarchy and passed the bill, then overturned a presidential veto to it almost unanimously.

Why Cuban-Americans Are Voting Differently this Presidential Election

Historically, the Cuban-American community has been considered a political monolith, voting mostly in support of the Republican Party, at least at the national level. To the extent that this has been true, it has been most applicable to the early exile community we now call the historicos.

The origins of this early exile support for the Republican Party can be reasonably traced to U.S. foreign policy, and to President Eisenhower’s robust anti-communist posture. Eisenhower and his Republican Party’s anti-Castro stance were followed by the cannibalization of the Bay of Pigs invasion plans under the Democratic leadership of President Kennedy and the resulting failure of the invasion.

Resolution Seeks to Block US Arms Sale to Saudi Arabia

‘Quiet Diplomacy’ Has Failed to Stem Abuses in Yemen Campaign

A bipartisan resolution was introduced in the US Congress today to block a US$1.15 billion weapons sale to Saudi Arabia. The proposed sale is the latest in a long line — the US sold more than US$20 billion in arms to Saudi Arabia in 2015. It comes as the US continues to provide logistical, tactical, and intelligence support to the Saudi-led military operation against the Houthis and their allies in Yemen that has resulted in numerous laws-of-war violations.

More than 10,000 civilians have been killed and wounded in the 18-month conflict and more than three million displaced. At least 80 percent of the population now relies on some form of humanitarian assistance.