Tag: El Salvador

El Salvador Votes for Water over Gold

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El Salvador (Inequality) – In response to enormous public pressure, lawmakers have rejected appeals by global corporations and voted to protect the country’s people and water supply by banning metallic mining.  The people of El Salvador and their international allies against…

Sex work: not prohibited, not permitted

Criminalization sets a context in which the range of human rights violations experienced by sex workers is validated. Cross-movement collaboration on decriminalizing sex work is needed, now, more than ever.

In mid-November, I attended a RedTraSex meeting to review “Advances, challenges and strategies of the RedTraSex: strengthening sustainability and advancing the recognition of our rights.” RedTraSex is the Red de Mujeres Trabajadoras Sexuales de Latinamérica y el Caribe (Network of Sex Workers of Latin America and the Caribbean.) RedTraSex, on the cusp of celebrating its 20th anniversary, is made up of organizations from fifteen countries – Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru and Dominican Republic.

Young women caught in deadly crossfire of El Salvador’s gang warfare

There is a whole generation behind bars, writes Amy Smith.

Huddled in a dingy classroom, groups of girls chat loudly as teacher Jórge Ramirez gets ready to begin the poetry class. Eventually, the dimly-lit room quietens and Ramirez announces today’s topic – ‘love’ – causing giggles to erupt from the back of the class.

It may seem like a typical teen school scene.

Yet, today’s lesson is far from normal. Set in the Rosa Social Female Reinsertion Centre, a Salvadoran prison surrounded by high-rise concrete walls and barbed wire, it is the place where many young women caught up in El Salvador’s bloody gang warfare end up. Frequently in the name of love.

Door to justice finally opens in El Salvador

As the door finally opens for war criminals to face justice in El Salvador, the law can start serving the country’s poor.

Following almost two decades of courageous activism from human rights defenders, on 13 July 2016 El Salvador’s highest court declared the General Amnesty Law unconstitutional, opening the door for war criminals to finally face justice.

El Salvador’s civil war, which pitched an authoritarian government against left leaning guerrilla groups, began in 1979 and raged for more than 12 years. By January 1992, when the peace accords were signed, the conflict had claimed 75,000 lives and an estimated 7,000 persons had disappeared.

Child Immigrants Detained at US Border Reach Record High

32,952 Unaccompanied Minors Arrested between October and May

The number of unaccompanied immigrant children detained at the southwestern US border continues to increase and has exceeded the figures recorded for 2015, according to data released by the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection (CPB).

With four months remaining in the fiscal year, which began on October 1, 2015, it was revealed that 32,952 unaccompanied children have been detained by border authorities, compared to 39,970 that were recorded throughout the previous fiscal year.

If we compare the data recorded up to April of this fiscal year with those in 2014 when there was a wave of child immigrating from Central America (described as a “humanitarian crisis”), the numbers show a similar situation could be repeated this time around.