Tag: education

US Dept. Of Agriculture Launches Interactive Online Climate Adaptation Info Resource

The US Department Of Agriculture (USDA) recently announced an online resource for climate shift information. Joining a broader network, it’s intended to educate the general public on climate change adaptive strategies.

Released by the Climate Change Resource Center (CCRC), the online resource also connects land managers and environmental decision makers. Described as “interactive”, the resource details climate adaptive endeavors sought by the USDA Forest Service, USDA Climate Hubs, and other agencies.

“Natural resource managers”, reads a USDA blog, “are already observing changes in their forests and range-lands.” Such changes manifest unprecedented challenges for land managers, from flooding to droughts. This ranges from bone gripping drought in California, to intense southern and east coast tropical storms.

Iran, Turkey Determined to Boost Ties: Envoy

Iranian Ambassador to Turkey Mohammad Ibrahim Taherian underlined the resolve of Tehran and Ankara to broaden and deepen their bilateral ties.

During a recent meeting in the Turkish capital with Head of Turkey’s Ana Vatan Party Ibrahim Celebi, the Iranian envoy said the two countries share numerous commonalities and are on the path toward congruent views on some regional developments.

He stressed that Tehran and Ankara should take on greater responsibilities to resolve ongoing crises in the region.

The Lost Language of Integration

In a recent This American Life episode, investigative journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones discusses the perils of America’s segregated school system. She points out that there has been only one proven way to narrow the performance gap between African-American and white schoolchildren, and it has nothing to do with magnet schools, or Teach for America, or any of the newfangled efforts to right a wrong system. The only strategy that has shown demonstrable success in the last half century has been: desegregation.

Between 1971 and 1988, the gap between the standardized reading scores of black and white 13-year-olds dropped by more than half. “And these scores are not just the scores of the specific kids who got bussed into white schools,” notes host Ira Glass. “That is the overall score for the entire country. That’s all black children in America, halved in just 17 years.”

How the Alt Right is trying to create a ‘safe space’ for racism on college campuses

A murmur began in May around Berkeley and the surrounding Bay Area as posters appeared overnight on the sides of buildings and wrapped on poles. Adorned with images of statues of antiquity, these classical images of European men depicted as gods were intended to light a spark of memory in the mostly white faces that passed by them. With lines like “Let’s become great again” printed on them, the posters were blatant in their calls for European “pride,” clearly connecting romanticized European empires of the past to the populism of Donald Trump today.

The posters were put up by Identity Europa, one of the lesser-known organizations amid that esoteric constellation of reactionary groups and figures known as the “Alt Right.” They were part of a campaign around the country enticing college-age white people to join a new kind of white nationalist movement. While similar posters emerged elsewhere on the West Coast and Midwest, in central California they pointed toward a public event — one directed specifically toward the tradition of free speech at the University of California at Berkeley.

Indoctrination: 35 Years of the US Department of Education

Since 1980, during the Carter Administration, America’s K-12 education system has come under increasing control by the dictates of the federal Department of Education (DOE) with failing results, taxing states and filtering the money through Washington to return a portion of it back to the states. In 2002, the Bush Administration approved the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act creating punishing amounts of federal paperwork and bureaucracy for local schools, requiring a $1B grant in special funding to help state and local education systems comply. In 2015 Congress enacted new legislation, Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), to allegedly overcome the NCLB federal intervention. The Heritage Foundation’s Lindsey Burke says, “ESSA does not accomplish these critical policy priorities” to reduce the interference and excessive hours of standardized testing time. The 2016 DOE budget is $70.7B excluding a Presidential request for an additional $75B mandatory funding over ten years for Pre-K education.

“We Are Still Fighting For A School For My Child”

Children and adolescents with disabilities face huge challenges to access education in South Africa. One year on from the release of Human Rights Watch’s report documenting barriers to a quality education for children with disabilities, the government has made little progress in addressing systemic barriers and introducing stronger reforms to guarantee inclusive education in South Africa.

Hundreds of thousands of children with disabilities are still out of school, but the government has not yet presented accurate data to show how many children with disabilities are out of school. The government continues to prioritize funding for special schools, to the detriment of inclusive education.

Another For-Profit College Folds

The closure of ITT Tech should be a warning to other educational institutions looking to make a dime at the expense of students.

Picking the right college isn’t a fun process.

Whether you’re a high school student eyeing your next step or a bit older looking to improve your career, the cycle of researching dozens of schools, preparing lengthy applications, waiting to hear back, and then figuring out if you can even afford it seems endless.

But now, prospective students have one less option to choose from. And in this case, that’s a good thing.

Why should Bill Gates decide how our children should be educated?

Billionaire philanthropists are imposing their views on the rest of society with little accountability for their actions.

“The students affected do not have the luxury of walking away from failed social experiments…When foundations enter into wholesale public-policy promotion using billions to lure tax-starved districts into scaling up untested models, they have a special obligation to act democratically” (David Bloomfield, Education Week, 2006).

James Foster is the mayor of a small, cash-strapped city in the Midwestern United States. That’s not his real name—I’m using pseudonyms to protect my informants. Like many public officials across America since the financial crash of 2008, Foster has faced crises so severe that he often thought he was out of options: with a dwindling population and a shrinking property tax base, the city’s schools have been suffering. Absent a bailout by the state, his school district was recently close to bankruptcy, and dozens of schools were in danger of closing.

Hot for Teacher: What you really need to know about #TeacherBae and Atlanta’s schools

Georgia’s schools are a disaster. 127 of them could be taken over by a new initiative from the governor’s office for “chronically failing.” In Atlanta, more than a quarter of students didn’t graduate last year, and that’s the best graduation rate on record. In 2014, 4 out of 10 didn’t graduate. Instead of focusing on that, Atlanta Public Schools are concerned with an educator who is apparently too pretty to teach.

Patrice Brown was recently named “Educator of the Month”. She’s a graduate of Alabama State University. She teaches 4th graders in Atlanta. Now, she’s being reprimanded by the district after her fashion choices went viral under the hashtag #teacherbae. Some of the clothing she’s seen sporting at school is tight fitting, but she’s a curvy woman.

The State and Manipulation of Education

American education is under attack in an attempt to turn your child into a corporate profit. Teachers, students, and communities are being used as pawns in a chess match. Politicians are filling their campaign piggybank to support and fund the private sector. Tax money is being used send students to attend religious, private, and charter schools. In many states the private sector has a lower success rate of performance, growth, and development.

An educational system that allows options serves a purpose. Families should have a say in what school their child attends. The problem lies when private sector does not have to play by the same rules and regulations in regards to assessment, yet are given funding that has been allocated for the public sector. Our schools are not broken. Our politicians are.
Currently, public schools are given funding based on how high test scores are at the end of the year. Lower performing schools have their funding cut for not performing well. This ideology sets up a system that will eventually force an economic segregation.