Tag: argentina

Sex work: not prohibited, not permitted

Criminalization sets a context in which the range of human rights violations experienced by sex workers is validated. Cross-movement collaboration on decriminalizing sex work is needed, now, more than ever.

In mid-November, I attended a RedTraSex meeting to review “Advances, challenges and strategies of the RedTraSex: strengthening sustainability and advancing the recognition of our rights.” RedTraSex is the Red de Mujeres Trabajadoras Sexuales de Latinamérica y el Caribe (Network of Sex Workers of Latin America and the Caribbean.) RedTraSex, on the cusp of celebrating its 20th anniversary, is made up of organizations from fifteen countries – Argentina, Belize, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru and Dominican Republic.

Energy transition in Latin America

Latin America is increasingly exploiting its renewable energy potential. New wind and solar projects are under construction across the region thanks to partnerships with Chinese energy companies.

Thanks to Chinese energy companies, Latin America is increasingly exploiting its renewable energy potential as historic laggards like Argentina get on board with the region’s energy transition. New wind and solar projects are under construction across the region as partnerships with Chinese deliver affordable finance and materials to local governments and businesses.

Operation Condor: A Transnational Criminal Conspiracy, Uncovered

The recent guilty verdict for the criminal pact between Latin American dictatorships in the 70’s reminds us that the struggle for memory, truth and justice upholds the pillars of democratic society.

On May 27, for the first time ever, a court in Latin America ruled that Operation Condor was a supranational criminal conspiracy organized to disappear political opponents across borders. The verdict was handed down by an Argentine court that convicted 14 high- and mid-ranking Argentine military officers who acted during the 1976-1983 dictatorship, and one Uruguayan military officer, for their involvement in this criminal plan.

This investigation into the Condor crimes began in Argentina in 1999 when two lawyers, David Baigún and Alberto Pedroncini, filed a legal complaint on behalf of five disappeared persons of different nationalities, all of them victims of the Southern Cone dictatorships’ repressive coordination during the 1970s. The main argument was that these disappearances were carried out in the framework of a conspiracy between the highest-ranking military and political leaders, making criminal use of the state apparatus, in a context of dictatorial regimes in our regio