Author: Friends of The Fifth Column

Saudi Arabia: Prosecution for Forming Human Rights Group

Short-Lived Organization Closed Under Pressure in 2013

Saudi prosecutors filed criminal charges against two activists in late October 2016, for “forming an unlicensed organization” and other vague charges relating to a short-lived human rights organization they set up in 2013, Human Rights Watch said today. None of the alleged “crimes” listed in the charge sheet resemble recognizable criminal behavior, and none of them took place after October 2013.

The defendants, Mohammad al-Otaibi and Abdullah al-Attawi, formed the Union for Human Rights in 2013, but they were unable to obtain a license for the group because Saudi Arabia generally did not allow independent non-charity nongovernmental organizations at that time. In late 2015, Saudi Arabia issued a new law that would theoretically allow such groups to obtain licenses, but authorities have continued to jail and prosecute independent activists based on similar charges.

APPOINTMENT OF CHINESE OFFICIAL TO HEAD OF INTERPOL PROVOKES WORRY

The recent appointment of Meng Hongwei as president of Interpol is one worrisome to human rights advocates across the world. Meng, China’s vice minister of public security, would be the first Chinese president of Interpol, though Chinese officials have served as vice presidents of Interpol and as members of its executive committee in the past. Presidents of Interpol serve four year terms and are elected by Interpol’s General Assembly.

Namely, in his position as vice minister of public security in China, Meng has used his position to orchestrate government crackdowns on group that the Chinese government views as undesirable. These include members of the Falun Gong and individuals targeted by Chinese president Xi Jinping’s ongoing anti-corruption campaign, which has in many cases used accusations of corruption to carry out political purges. Meng was also appointed head of China’s Coast Guard in 2012 and carried out the militarization of the civilian coast guard in order to bolster China’s disputed territorial claims in the South and East China Seas.

Ethiopian Authorities Arrest Zone9 Blogger Befeqadu Hailu Citing ‘State of Emergency’

Befeqadu Hailu, one of the best-known voices in Ethiopia’s stifled media environment, was arrested on November 10, 2016. In the morning hours, authorities took Befeqadu from his home to a jail cell in a nearby police station. He spent the day in there and was then transferred to a police station located in a neighborhood called Kotebe.

A member of the high-profile Zone9 blogger collective and a Global Voices contributor, Befeqadu is an active voice in the blogosphere and on Twitter. When the Ethiopian government declared a state of emergency, he wrote:

Russian Minister Ulyukayev Put Under House Arrest Over Bribery Accusations

A Moscow district court ruled on Tuesday to place Economic Development Minister Alexei Ulyukayev under house arrest in the large bribery case for two months.

Earlier in the day, Ulyukayev was officially charged with bribery on a very large scale. Ulyukayev demanded a bribe for a positive assessment of Russian energy company Rosneft’s acquisition of Bashneft company’s shares, according to the Russian Investigative Committee said.

Investigators said in court they had compelling evidence against Ulyukayev, including audio and video recordings, witness accounts, as well as fingerprints on banknotes.

US drone base in Tunisia: expanding a borderless war against terror to North Africa

By normalising the use of drones, the US might be planting a seed that people in the Arab world reject: the seed of arbitrariness.

Despite the large criticism directed toward the unabated use of armed drones as a weapon of choice in the “global war against terror”, led by the United States, the recent revelations about the establishment of a US drone base in Tunisia show that their use is expanding.

This information comes after the announcement of the construction of a 100 million drone base in Agadez, in the centre of Niger, indicating an increase of counterterrorist drone operations in north-west Africa. Although governments in the region have publically claimed they are not hosting US bases, there remains little doubt that such bases do exist at least in Niger and Tunisia, signalling an unconstrained and dangerous expansion.

Iran, Turkey Determined to Boost Ties: Envoy

Iranian Ambassador to Turkey Mohammad Ibrahim Taherian underlined the resolve of Tehran and Ankara to broaden and deepen their bilateral ties.

During a recent meeting in the Turkish capital with Head of Turkey’s Ana Vatan Party Ibrahim Celebi, the Iranian envoy said the two countries share numerous commonalities and are on the path toward congruent views on some regional developments.

He stressed that Tehran and Ankara should take on greater responsibilities to resolve ongoing crises in the region.

Kazakhstan: Beer Baron’s Downfall Spells Trouble for Activist Trial

A military court in Kazakhstan has sentenced a brewery tycoon to 21 years on coup-plotting charges, bringing a close to an opaque two-month-long trial that shed little light on exactly what happened.

The fear now is that Tohtar Tuleshov’s conviction could have grave repercussions for small-time civil activists charged on related offenses.

The Astana Military Court on November 7 determined that Tuleshov had sought to provoke turmoil by financing a wave of anti-government protests, as well as financing a transnational criminal group.

Now Might Be a Great Time to Work on Reining in the Executive

According to the polls, the overarching driving force behind Trump’s win was anger toward “elites.” Donald Trump’s election is a tremendous challenge for freedom. But like most challenges, it’s also an opportunity. We may have never had this much bipartisan, cross-ideological, popular support for wresting power away from government.

As Jeffrey Tucker put it, “Everyone underestimated the vulnerability of the status quo.” The existing power structures are weak. It’s time to hit them with everything we’ve got.

In case you need a refresher on how powerful our government has become, Donald Trump now commands:

TURKEY ARRESTS UN JUDGE, VIOLATES DIPLOMATIC IMMUNITY

A Turkish judge who formerly served on international criminal proceedings concerning Yugoslavia and Rwanda has been arrested.

The judge is accused of being involved in some way with the coup attempt this past July. The UN court president Theodor Meron told the UN general assembly today that the Turkish government has denied several requests to visit the incarcerated judge.

As a judge for the UN, Aydin Sedaf Akay would be entitled to diplomatic immunity and some are saying this is possibly the first time this privilege of UN judges has ever been violated.

Iconic ‘Afghan Girl’ to Get Free Medical Treatment in India

The famous Afghan Girl is now a proxy for the regional contest between India and Pakistan. India to offer her free medical treatment after Pakistan deports her to Afghanistan for illegal stay

India has offered free medical treatment to the famous ‘Afghan Girl’ Sharbat Gula whose piercing blue eyes as a young pubescent captivated the world in 1985. Now a grown up woman with poverty and destitution having dulled her sharp features, she was in the news after Pakistan deported her to Afghanistan from Pakistan for illegally stay.

Sharbat Gula may arrive in India in the next few days to receive free treatment offered by a hospital in Bengaluru.

Japan, S. Korea Ink Controversial Intelligence Deal

South Korea and Japan reached a controversial deal Monday to share defense intelligence, Japanese officials said, despite protests from opposition parties and activists in Seoul.

Japan controlled the Korean peninsula as a colony from 1910-1945, with the legacy of the harsh rule marring relations with both North and South Korea today.

South Korea and Japan were on the verge of signing a deal in June 2012, but Seoul suddenly backtracked, with Japanese media blaming anti-Japanese sentiment among the South Korean public for the move.

Africa presents united front and calls for action at COP22

The 22nd Session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP22) kick-started Monday, 7 November in Marrakesh (Morocco).

A collaborative partnership between the Africa Development Bank (AfDB), the African Union Commission (AUC), the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) and the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) established the Africa Pavilion in the blue zone of the COP22 village, dedicated to engagement, networking and dialogue. The Pavilion also aims to provide a platform for the voices of the continent to be heard.

The Pavilion embodies the united front of an Africa “speaking with one voice” in articulating its interests given the high stakes of climate change negotiations