Tag: Republican Party

Was the Anti-Globalist Movement Infiltrated by Provocateurs?

Subsequent to the United Kingdom’s «Brexit» referendum, which saw 51.9 percent of voters in the United Kingdom opt to leave the European Union, political forces around the world were encouraged that the forces of anti-globalism had achieved a substantial victory. The Brexit success was followed a month later by the U.S. Republican Party’s nomination of anti-globalist businessman Donald Trump as the traditionally pro-free trade party’s presidential candidate. UK Independence Party (UKIP) leader Nigel Farage traveled to the Republican convention in Cleveland to forge an anti-global common front with Trump.

In just two months, a series of embarrassing revelations about Trump’s past as a philandering television celebrity and UKIP internal political upheavals, left the two most potent anti-globalist forces in the world – the Trump presidential campaign and UKIP – in shambles. The rapid decline of both political movements led to a belief by many political observers that outside influences, led by professional «agents provocateurs» employed by globalist powerbrokers, caused the fracturing of the Trump and Farage movements.

Berned Out: Jill Stein Fans Flames of Abandoned Revolution

It’s official. Bernie Sanders has thrown his weight behind the eventual Democratic nominee, Hillary Clinton. In a joint appearance on July 12, 2016, Sanders conceded that, “Secretary Clinton has won the Democratic nomination”. He then congratulated her, and went on to say that he intended “to do everything I can to make certain she will be the next president of the United States”. The process of uniting the party has begun. But what does that mean for the millions of people who believed they were fighting for a “political revolution”, echoing the battles cries of “Never Hillary”, and “Bernie or Bust”? Are they expected to disappear back into the fold of the establishment Democratic Party?

Jill Stein doesn’t think so.

What is Donald Trump’s Endgame?: Revisited

Back in February, I wrote an article speculating about what Donald Trump was trying to achieve with his bid for the presidency. Given the strong social ties between the Trump and Clinton families, I concluded that Trump does not actually want to be president and that the likely reason for his candidacy was to help Hillary Clinton’s campaign. I argued that his campaign was a deliberate attempt to alienate the demographics that the Republican Party needs to win the general election. Since I wrote that article, Donald Trump has done just that and has become the GOP’s presumptive nominee. Hillary Clinton has also come close to winning the Democratic nomination. In light of these developments, it is worth revisiting my previous theory about Trump.

Since my previous article, Trump’s actions have largely conformed to the theory that I put forth. I argued that Trump would probably gain a following amongst the most extreme parts of the GOP and then leave the party, which would leave the Republicans divided and unable to contest the general election. However, Trump’s campaign has been unexpectedly successful and he has since become the frontrunner of his party. In this position, Trump has been able to sabotage the Republican Party. Trump has increasingly taken extreme “policy positions” and has, in the process, made him and the Republican Party very unpopular with important voter demographics. This has basically assured his defeat in the general election. His antics have also tarnished the reputations of many of the other Republican candidates and are threatening the reelection prospects of Republicans in the House and Senate. This has caused civil war within the party that has left them in disarray.