Tag: oil

Country profile: South Sudan

Eleanor Hobhouse considers the state of Africa’s newest nation, five years after independence.

The road from Juba airport (one of the few paved roads in the country) is a dilapidated parade marked by unfinished and decayed buildings, which sprung up in the heady days following hard-won independence from Sudan in 2011. Juba itself, once a small trading outpost on the Nile, is now a dusty urban sprawl, teeming with UN personnel, military and motorcades. The marked lack of infrastructure (more notable still outside the capital) speaks to a long history of neglect.

At Sudan’s independence in 1956, the British failed to deliver on promises of autonomous rule to the southern states, which were culturally, ethnically, linguistically and religiously distinct. This opened the door to inevitable conflict. A brief period of stability was heralded by the 1972 Addis Ababa Agreement, which awarded the South the right to self-government. But this disintegrated in 1983 and hostilities resumed, leading to the formation of the rebel Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA), headed by the charismatic John Garang.

How to Prevent Another DAPL

For the last few months, the Dakota Access Pipeline has captured the nation’s attention. After Energy Transfer Partners started construction on a pipeline near the Standing Rock Reservation, local Native American tribes protested the pipeline on the grounds that it could pollute their water supplies. Word of the protests spread and thousands of protesters flocked to Standing Rock. After months of confrontations between protesters and militarized police, the Army Corps of Engineers paused the project pending an environmental impact assessment.

The Native American tribes and environmentalists hailed this development as a victory, albeit a temporary one. Donald Trump, who will soon be taking office, has vowed to complete the DAPL and has signaled a willingness to carry out this campaign promise by filling his administration with oil executives and people who have invested heavily in the project. As a result, anti-DAPL protesters are gearing up for a long protest season.

Structural Racism Has Big Oil’s Dirty Fingerprints All Over It

Climate change has long had its heaviest impact on people of colour. Were it not for structural racism that dehumanises them, and the interconnections between big oil and the arms industry, the world would have taken action to protect the climate long ago.

The Philippines has opened a new chapter in the fight against climate change. The south-east asian nation has initiated legal proceedings to summon the 47 worst polluting corporations to its Commission on Human Rights. The case asserts these major polluters should be held to account for climate change and its impact upon the human rights of Philippines citizens; notably the death and destruction that resulted from ‘super typhoons’ linked to climate change. The lawsuit is being brought by the survivors of these intensifying super typhoons, which batter the archipelago annually. These kill people thousands, and displace people in their millions. Defending against the effects of these unprecedented storms, and clearing up afterwards, consumes an increasing proportion of the nation’s GDP. To continue with this destructive business as usual, big oil conglomerates must both deny the destruction and deny the worth of those being annihilated.

Standing Rock Protectors Threatened With Blockade Of Food And Medicine

Tensions flare once more as North Dakota officials graduate their militarized tactics against protesters. Sheriffs have now threatened a blockade of people, food, and medicine to the camps.

The threats comes on the heels of the US Army Corps of Engineers warning protesters to leave by December 5th. Anyone remaining stay under fear of prosecution for trespassing. Fines have also thrown into the basket of incentives for the water protectors to surrender.

Establishing a blockade represents yet another ultra-militarized tactic used against peaceful American citizens. Denying nourishment and medical treatment is a classic strategy to degrade will and resolve. Combined with harsh weather conditions, water protectors are faced with a tormentingly deadly roulette.

BP in Talks with Iran to Develop 4 Oilfields

Director of National Iranian South Oil Company Bijan Alipour said negotiations are underway with the British Petroleum (BP) on development of four oilfields in south of Iran.

The National Iranian South Oil Company has held talks with 22 domestic and foreign companies for contracts to develop Karanj, Parsi, Rag Sefid and Shadegan Oilfields, Alipour said Monday, speaking on the sidelines of an exhibition of oil industry equipment in Ahvaz, capital of southwestern province of Khuzestan.

Among them are Russian and Chinese firms as well as BP, he said, predicting that the negotiations will lead to signing of memorandums of understanding in a few months.

ExxonMobil’s Significant Oil Find Off Guyana Leads to Questions About the Country’s Future

U.S. oil giant ExxonMobil made waves in Guyana on Thursday June 30, 2016 by announcing it had confirmed a “world-class discovery” of oil offshore. The company said results from its exploration well in the Stabroek block, about 120 miles (193 kilometres) offshore Guyana, found between 800 million and 1.4 billion oil-equivalent barrels.

Guyana’s natural resources minister, Raphael Trotman, called the discovery fantastic news, telling News Source Guyana that “the future of Guyana has now been written and I think that this is going to send ripples throughout the world.” Minister Trotman added that the country was receiving support and guidance from the international community, including the Canadian, U.S. and Mexican governments, the European Union and the Commonwealth Secretariat.