Tag: nasa

HOW “OPEN SOURCE” SEED PRODUCERS FROM THE U.S. TO INDIA ARE CHANGING GLOBAL FOOD PRODUCTION

Around the world, plant breeders are resisting what they see as corporate control of the food supply by making seeds available for other breeders to use.

Frank Morton has been breeding lettuce since the 1980s. His company offers 114 varieties, among them Outredgeous, which last year became the first plant that NASA astronauts grew and ate in space. For nearly 20 years, Morton’s work was limited only by his imagination and by how many different kinds of lettuce he could get his hands on. But in the early 2000s, he started noticing more and more lettuces were patented, meaning he would not be able to use them for breeding. The patents weren’t just for different types of lettuce, but specific traits such as resistance to a disease, a particular shade of red or green, or curliness of the leaf. Such patents have increased in the years since, and are encroaching on a growing range of crops, from corn to carrots — a trend that has plant breeders, environmentalists and food security experts concerned about the future of the food production.

A determined fellow dedicated to the millennia-old tradition of plant breeding, Morton still breeds lettuce — it just takes longer, because more restrictions make it harder for him to do his work.

It’s Official: We’re Going to Mars

A bipartisan bill was passed by the U.S. Senate committee that oversees NASA space projects. The bill would allocate $19.5 billion in funds to NASA in 2017, but it has a critical mission for the space agency: send men to Mars.

It looks like Republican and Democratic senators alike are keen on safeguarding America’s space programs. With the potential chaos of a new president on the horizon, the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation passed a bipartisan bill giving NASA $19.5 billion to continue working on a mission to Mars. It also includes support for the continuation of the program to send astronauts on private rockets to the International Space Station (ISS) from American soil no later than 2018.

God’s-Eye View: Mainstream Acedimia Mobilizes Against 15 Year Old Correlating Mayan City Find With Stars

One day, it’s reported that a 15 year old Canadian boy discovered a Mayan city using a star map. The next, sources come out attempting to “debunk” the teen’s discovery, or at least its connection with the heavens. Why though, was the academic status quo so quick to mobilize against this story, and that celestial detail?

Countless examples of anonymous monuments and unclaimed megaliths worldwide continue to beckon humanity to a prior age. Thousands have marveled over how such structures were made and for what purpose. Few suggestions seem more taboo, however, than to suggest any correlation between ancient man and the stars. That’s exactly what 15 year old William Gadoury, of Saint Jeen De Matha, did upon putting an idea to the test.