Tag: muslim

Malaysians Can Have Their Cake and Eat It Too Inside McDonald’s — But Only If It’s Halal

The decision of the Malaysian office of fast food giant McDonald’s to ban non-halal cakes inside its premises has been criticized for allegedly promoting an intolerant and extreme version of Islam.

Malaysia has a predominantly Malay Muslim population, although the state advocates the unity of diverse races and ethnic groups.

Halal certification in Malaysia means that a food product has been endorsed by an accredited religious authority as meeting Islamic standards.

REPORT: BOMBING MUSLIM COUNTRIES RESULTS IN MORE ATTACKS AT HOME

According to a report from the European Counter Terrorism Centre (ECTC), European countries who are taking part in the US-led coalition against ISIS are more likely to suffer terrorist attacks at home– and the trend is expected to rise.

France ranked especially high on the list; Belgium, Germany, and the UK are also particularly susceptible to attacks. Ultimately however, the report also states that any country participating in the US-led coalition can expect a wave of “IS inspired attacks” from both organized groups and lone wolves. Attacks on European soil are not only expected to increase, but the ECTC expects attackers to shift away from symbolic targets and focus towards more soft targets with more civilian casualties. They expect the attacks carried out by organized groups to become more complex and could involve more car bomb style attacks similar to those in Iraq.

Peace Walks across all of Ghana

Civil society in Ghana has mobilised in large numbers to ensure that the 7th December elections will be fair and peaceful. Faith-based organisations, local NGOs, women’s groups, artists, sportspeople, and prominent Ghanaians have stood up to promote peace and solidarity in Ghana. This popular peace movement is not partisan and does not carry political messages – it is a celebration of democracy.

The Embassy of Denmark supports the work of the Christian Council of Ghana and the Office of the National Chief Imam. Together they are currently implementing the Interfaith Sensitisation Programme on Peace, where they reach out to the Ghanaian youth via different activities such as community/interfaith dialogues and Peace Walks. Dialogues and walks have been organised across five regions, including in Kumasi, Aflao, Wa, Bimbila, Tamale and Accra.

Special Forces Operatives Photographed In Syria, Black War Darkens

More photos of clandestine American operators have surfaced from Syria’s war torn heart. The unidentified unit, sources report, were sighted outside ISIS-controlled Raqqa. These latest photographs come as offensives in both Iraq and Syria launch to reclaim militant towns.

Unlike photographs taken months ago, the journalists responsible have been identified. RT Arabic correspondent Muhammad Hassan’s team reported seeing “dozens” of Americans during their trip to Syria. “They have the latest weapons and vehicles.” he says, according to RT. Hassan also described how “they, as well as soldiers from European countries” are involved in “battles” for Raqqa. Other photos circulated by RT were taken by Reuters journalists.

Palestinians Protest against Israel’s ‘Quiet Mosques’ Bill

Hundreds of Palestinians within Israel and the Gaza Strip demonstrated on Friday against a bill to limit the volume of calls to prayer at mosques.

In the southern city of Rahat, 100 Palestinians held a rally against the bill, while more than 500 people took part in various demonstrations in the north, police said.

In the northern city of Jisr al-Zarqa, lawmaker Ahmed Tibi of the Arab Joint List called the legislation “a provocation and act of coercion in the place of dialogue and tolerance”, a party spokesperson said.

Japanese Police Are Spying on Muslims, Despite The Constitution

Police in Tokyo have monitored the activities of Muslims in Japan, based on their religion alone, since at least 2008. A court case challenging the constitutionality of this surveillance program was recently denied.

On May 31, 2016, Japan’s Supreme Court dismissed the case questioning the legality of conducting surveillance on and profiling Muslims in Japan, even though surveillance based on religion or ethnicity is generally illegal under Japan’s constitution, which enshrines the right to privacy, equal protection under the law, and freedom of religion. This marked the culmination of several years of lawsuits by the same group of plaintiffs in different courts, resulting in a variety of judgments.