Tag: Freedom

A call center run by refugees fills a void in Greece

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Refugees arriving in Greece have found themselves forced to organize in order to survive. One of the most basic needs, after feeding oneself, is to be able to communicate — to be able to ask for help, to go to the doctor, to get a lawyer, to know your rights, to get out of the refugee camp and to work in a new country. These tasks can be extremely difficult for refugees in Greece, the majority of whom only speak Arabic.

Ramez Shame, who is a refugee from Egypt, speaks both Arabic and English, which is a second language for many in Greece. As soon as he realized how his language skills could help others, he went to work. After taking stock of the needs of refugees, Shame and three others started a cooperative hotline in Thessaloniki to act as a bridge for refugees, called the Refugees to Refugees (R2R) Solidarity Call Center.

EFF To Canadian Court: Order Allowing Worldwide Censorship of Google Search Results Violates Users’ Free Speech Rights

Tuesday Hearing in Case With Potentially Significant Implications for Free Speech

On Tuesday, Dec. 6, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) will tell Canada’s highest court that an overbroad court order that censors Google search results for users everywhere violates our rights to freely search the web without government interference.

The court is hearing arguments in Google v. Equustek, a trade secret case in which a British Columbia court issued an order forcing Google to block certain websites from its search results around the world, setting a dangerous precedent for online free expression. Equustek Solutions sued a group of defendants for allegedly misappropriating designs for its routers and selling counterfeit routers online. While Google isn’t a party to the case and had done nothing wrong, Equustek obtained a court order telling the search engine company it must delete search results that directed users to the defendants’ websites, not just in Canada but from all other local domains such Google.com and Google.go.uk. EFF filed a brief in the case siding with Google.

Black Youth and Elusive Freedom

As I weep over the death of America’s black men, I remember my brother’s struggle for his freedom against unnecessary police searches.

This summer brought too many new videos of black men — Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge, Phillando Castile in a St. Paul suburb, Terrence Crutcher in Tulsa, Oklahoma — losing their lives at the hands of police officers.

As these videos circulated, I found myself crying new tears. Yet these new tears are filled with old memories.

Reasons to thank your local criminal

What causes societal change? Crime. From acts of civil disobedience to organized criminal endeavors; it’s somebody willing to stand up and claim a dormant or unasserted right that forces government’s to change. Contrary to the founding documents of this country, rights are not “self-evident”. If they were, “we the people” would have meant more than “we the people who are white” when the words were first penned. Rights are claimed, asserted, and sometimes taken by force.

The “law and order” crowd is squirming at the concept. Luckily, the members of that crowd are typically ardent defenders of the Second Amendment. That right wasn’t always there. Reaching back through history, tyrants of all sorts disarmed their populations. That right was claimed through the blood of criminals. Of course, today we call them “patriots” but that was a different year. They were criminals and traitors, nothing more. They only became heroes once they succeeded in claiming their rights.

Why TFC Chose an Image of Christopher Dorner for our Memorial Day post

Surprisingly, it wasn’t simply to be inflammatory and you probably can’t guess why.

The Fifth Column posted a simple Memorial Day message: “We salute veterans who died fighting for our freedom.” The image chosen to accompany it was a photo of Christopher Dorner. Christopher Dorner didn’t die fighting in a war in Afghanistan or Iraq. He died fighting a war in California. The war he died fighting in was a war on police corruption. In the process of his war he killed an innocent.

Last month, the Column’s most popular post was a quote about how veterans and activists need to work together to cause real change in the United States. While it was a very popular post, there was a heated debate with insults and accusations thrown by both sides in the comments section. This outlet tries to serve as a battleground for ideas. When heated debate occurs, the outlet is doing is job.

As expected, there were a number of comments under our Memorial Day post of the same nature. This article was drafted prior to the post going live to respond to the anticipated objections. Below are anticipated objections or statements, almost all of which can be found in the comments section under the post.